Category: Dog Veterinary Surgery

Dog ACL Surgery: 6 Important Things to Consider

Dog ACL Surgery: 6 Important Things to Consider

What is Dog ACL Surgery? Dog ACL surgery or otherwise known as canine cruciate surgery is a very stressful and expensive endeavor for dog owners. Veterinarians use ACL surgery to repair a torn cranial cruciate ligament in your dog’s knee. Nobody likes to see a beloved family member in pain! And, of course, you have questions. The list of questions going through your mind may be infinite: Is dog ACL surgery really necessary?   How much does it cost? What is the success rate? Are other options available aside from ACL surgery? Which surgery should I choose? We’ve compiled some information to

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Dog after ACL surgery

What You Need to Know After Your Dog has ACL Surgery

 Bringing your dog home after ACL surgery can be a daunting experience! ACL surgery is a significant operation.  The incision and stitches appear painful, and your dog may seem sluggish and “out of it.” How do you know what is normal and what is not normal? Is there anything special you can do to make your dog feel better? The following information should put your mind at ease! What to Expect the Night Immediately After ACL Surgery Here’s a compilation of situations that seem concerning to pet owners after surgery. Although concerning to pet owners, the following scenarios are normal

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Dog with injured leg

5 Things You Need to Know About Dog ACL Surgery

Having Trouble With A Dog ACL Injury? Caring for a dog with an ACL injury can be a daunting experience! Specialists chant “Surgery! Surgery!” as your dog limps and your wallet screams in pain. Make sure you do your research–you may have more options than you originally considered! #1 Your Dog May Not Need Surgery If your dog suffers from only a partial cruciate ligament tear, he or she may not need surgery. You must visit a veterinarian to understand the severity of your dog’s ACL injury. Sometimes limiting activity as the leg heals will resolve an ACL tear. For partial

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Picture of external skeletal fixation in dog

External Skeletal Fixation Device Home Care Instructions

An external skeletal fixation device consists of multiple pins and external bars that hold a fractured bone in place while healing takes place. The best benefit of using an external skeletal fixation device to correct a broken leg is the ease of at-home maintenance. External Skeletal Fixation Device Home Care Instructions When you take your pet home from the hospital, there are three main things that the owner needs to be aware of: Confine your dog. It is very important to confine your dog to avoid additional injury. In a few short days, your dog will start bearing weight on the

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Image for Biopsy Procedure for Dogs and Cats

Biopsy Procedure for Dogs and Cats

Why Might You Need  A Biopsy Procedure? A biopsy procedure for dogs and cats provides important information regarding the seriousness of your pet’s condition. A biopsy also confirms the diagnosis and the best course of treatment. Different Biopsy Procedures for Dogs and Cats Veterinarians use several different biopsy procedures for dogs and cats: Punch:  This type of biopsy uses a circular blade varying in size from 1 mm to 8 mm. The blade is attached to a handle and rotates down into the tissue to extract a small cylindrical shaped sample. Topical anesthetic mitigates any pain and discomfort. Afterward, the

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Tibial Tuberosity Advancement Surgery (TTA Surgery)

Tibial tuberosity advancement surgery or TTA is the latest surgical treatment for cranial cruciate ligament disease in the dog. TTA is indicated for dogs weighing more than 50 lbs. Along with TPLO, TTA is considered a “bone cutting” procedure that minimizes tibial thrust and aids in stabilizing the stifle joint. Currently, four surgical options exist for a torn cruciate ligament in the dog. They are TPLO, TTA, Tightrope, and lateral suture. Pros of Tibial Tuberosity Advancement Surgery 1. Creates 90-degree angle between the tibial plateau and patellar ligament thereby eliminating tibial thrust and lameness. 2. Early return to function with

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